Image related to Statement from CFMEU National Construction Secretary Dave Noonan
Created Tue 2/09/2014, Last Updated Tue 2/09/2014

Statement from CFMEU National Construction Secretary Dave Noonan

The Trade Union Royal Commission today heard evidence of conflict between Fair Work Building Commission (FWBC) inspectors and construction workers and union officials on building sites. 

Swearing on building sites is nothing new and doesn’t warrant a $53 million Royal Commission. The greater scandal is that industry regulators have been asleep at the wheel. 

Image related to Giving employers open slather on overseas workers is a catastrophe for Australia
Created Fri 29/08/2014, Last Updated Fri 29/08/2014

Giving employers open slather on overseas workers is a catastrophe for Australia

The Federal Government decision to allow foreign workers with poor English into Australia on low wages will result in less employment, lower wages and more accidents for local workers, according to the Construction Forestry Mining and Energy Union (CFMEU).

CFMEU National Secretary Michael O'Connor said today that new "Designated Area Migration Agreements" (DAMAs) would hurt the employment chances of young Australians by allowing employers to use overseas workers to undercut the local labour market.

Image related to Crisis in Australian apprenticeships: construction apprenticeships down by almost a third; shortfall of 3,300 mining apprenticeships
Apprentices
Created Thu 21/08/2014, Last Updated Thu 21/08/2014

Crisis in Australian apprenticeships: construction apprenticeships down by almost a third; shortfall of 3,300 mining apprenticeships

An independent analysis commissioned by the Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union (CFMEU) has revealed a crisis in Australian apprenticeships, with:

  • A national shortfall of mining apprenticeships of 3,300
  • Construction apprenticeships down by 28 percent since 2010
  • The ratio of apprentices to tradespeople in construction at its lowest level since 2003 - 12.4 per cent.

The report found the mining sector would need to increase apprentices by around 37 per cent to match its share of total tradespeople.